Gyudon (Beef Bowl)

21
GYUDON (BEEF BOWL)

 2 cups uncooked short grain rice – for serving
 2 tbsp grapeseed oil or other neutral oil
 2 lbs thinly sliced beef – I recommend ribeye or chuck.
 1 lb yellow onions, thick julienne
 1 tsp garlic, minced
 1 ½ cups dashi – homemade is best or you may use Hondashi (see notes)1
  cup mirin
 2 tbsp sake
 1 tbsp sugar
  cup usukuchi soy sauce (see notes)2
 1 tsp sesame oil
 Garnish green onions, sliced
 Garnish toasted sesame seeds
 Garnish beni shoga – red pickled ginger (see notes)3
 Onsen tamago slow cooked egg (optional – see notes)4
 Togarashi shichimi to spice it up (optional)

 

1

Cook your rice.

2

Heat a saute pan on medium-high with grapeseed oil.

3

Add the onions and caramelize lightly.

4

Add your beef, garlic, dashi, mirin, sake, sugar and sesame oil.

5

Stir until well combined and sugar is dissolved.

6

Bring to a simmer then cover with a lid to prevent reduction and evaporation of your tasty simmering liquid.

7

Cook for 15-20 minutes until onions are tender and beef is no longer pink.
click for 15 Minute timer

8

Serve over rice and garnish with green onions and sesame seeds.

9

Optional: add a sous vide egg for extra richness and/or togarashi shichimi to spice it up.

Notes
10

Dashi: we make our own at Goro and Gun. It’s a two day process. If you’re up for the challenge, make your own. If not, just buy Hondashi, which is a powder similar to chicken bouillon and follow the manufacturer’s instructions.

11

Usukuchi soy sauce is a light colored soy sauce. It tastes the same if not better than regular soy sauce. I use this to keep the dish from being so dark in color.

12

Beni shoga: I make my own at Gun Izakaya. We julienne our ginger by hand then pickle it with vinegar and beet juice for color, instead of red food coloring like the commercially produced product. Store bought beni shoga taste just as great and it complements this dish really well.

13

Onsen tamago is essentially just a sous vide egg. It’s called onsen because you can put an egg in a Japanese hot spring to cook it slowly, which is a similar process to a sous vide before modern technology. Heat an 8-quart water bath to 167°F, add 4-6 large eggs, and cook for 12 minutes. Shock immediately.

Ingredients

 2 cups uncooked short grain rice – for serving
 2 tbsp grapeseed oil or other neutral oil
 2 lbs thinly sliced beef – I recommend ribeye or chuck.
 1 lb yellow onions, thick julienne
 1 tsp garlic, minced
 1 ½ cups dashi – homemade is best or you may use Hondashi (see notes)1
  cup mirin
 2 tbsp sake
 1 tbsp sugar
  cup usukuchi soy sauce (see notes)2
 1 tsp sesame oil
 Garnish green onions, sliced
 Garnish toasted sesame seeds
 Garnish beni shoga – red pickled ginger (see notes)3
 Onsen tamago slow cooked egg (optional – see notes)4
 Togarashi shichimi to spice it up (optional)

Directions

1

Cook your rice.

2

Heat a saute pan on medium-high with grapeseed oil.

3

Add the onions and caramelize lightly.

4

Add your beef, garlic, dashi, mirin, sake, sugar and sesame oil.

5

Stir until well combined and sugar is dissolved.

6

Bring to a simmer then cover with a lid to prevent reduction and evaporation of your tasty simmering liquid.

7

Cook for 15-20 minutes until onions are tender and beef is no longer pink.
click for 15 Minute timer

8

Serve over rice and garnish with green onions and sesame seeds.

9

Optional: add a sous vide egg for extra richness and/or togarashi shichimi to spice it up.

Notes
10

Dashi: we make our own at Goro and Gun. It’s a two day process. If you’re up for the challenge, make your own. If not, just buy Hondashi, which is a powder similar to chicken bouillon and follow the manufacturer’s instructions.

11

Usukuchi soy sauce is a light colored soy sauce. It tastes the same if not better than regular soy sauce. I use this to keep the dish from being so dark in color.

12

Beni shoga: I make my own at Gun Izakaya. We julienne our ginger by hand then pickle it with vinegar and beet juice for color, instead of red food coloring like the commercially produced product. Store bought beni shoga taste just as great and it complements this dish really well.

13

Onsen tamago is essentially just a sous vide egg. It’s called onsen because you can put an egg in a Japanese hot spring to cook it slowly, which is a similar process to a sous vide before modern technology. Heat an 8-quart water bath to 167°F, add 4-6 large eggs, and cook for 12 minutes. Shock immediately.

Gyudon (Beef Bowl)